Juniper Rescue

As all of you know I am a metal artist.

Every day I deal with designing and making things from metal…mostly steel.  So what’s up with those stacks of wood drying in my studio?

I think there is just something beautiful about a solid piece of wood.

The wood I have drying in my metal studio is interesting because it was rejected by the sawmill, and therefore, destined for the chipper.

Yes, destined to be chipped up and sent to the bottom of some farmer’s chicken house.

Florida_chicken_houseWhat a horrible life! If I can turn that reject into something beautiful then that makes life better for everyone

…OK maybe not the chickens…

My latest rescue is a piece of juniper that was a problem for the sawmill.  It was not straight, and builders want straight!

That also means sawmill guys want straight.

I was looking for a tree that had a flair on the end of the trunk to use as a design element for a bench.  Mr. Earl (the sawmill guy) told me he had some juniper and it would probably meet my needs.  After a few minutes climbing on the wood pile I found the juniper logs.

The piece I wanted was almost uniform in diameter, but had a curve in it near the bottom.  The curve was a defect and Mr. Earl would not be interested in cutting it for boards.  So out it came.

wood 1

It took me a few minutes to get him to understand that I needed to prop up the thin end so the center of the log was level to the saw.  I wanted it to be cut through the center and then a slab cut on each side.  That would create two book matched pieces.  (as if they were two pages of a book, mirror images of each other)

 

 

The cutting went well and we discovered a large void inside the trunk which caused it to bend.  Not a problem for me.  It is actually an interesting feature that I hope to emphasize when the wood is used.

wood 2

What will it be?  I don’t know yet.

Green wood needs to dry for about 2 years before it can be used for furniture.  There is plenty of time to dream up the design.

So what are you finding that no one else thinks is of value?

I’d love to hear your thoughts and learn about your finds.

Email me at steve@stephenzmetaldesigns.com

or just use the form below.

 

In the mean time I’ll be on the look out for another log that needs rescuing.

 

 

 

Advertisements

1 Comment

  1. Stephen,

    Hmm… I can relate to this post. I look forward to seeing what you do with those sequentially-cut slices of juniper… especially that one with the interesting hole in it.

    Chris


Comments RSS TrackBack Identifier URI

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s